Small Batch Challah Rolls

challah rolls from overhead

Small Batch Challah Rolls

I am hopeful that this year will mean smaller gatherings for people in the US for Thanksgiving. I wanted to assist with your small Thanksgiving gathering. This round up is perfect for Thanksgivings sizes 1-4. These recipes make about 4 servings each, which is perfect for 1-4 people and leftovers if less than 4 people! Tyler and I have had so many small Thanksgivings when we lived in St. Louis and couldn’t make it home for both Thanksgiving and Christmas/Hanukah. So, we usually chose the latter and I would make us a small Thanksgiving meal like this.

I do also want to take this time to bring up Thanksgiving and how we learn about it. Thanksgiving is something I now celebrate as a time for good food and showing thanks and gratitude for the ones I love. However, the story we learned as kids about Thanksgiving is so off and really shouldn’t be a part of the celebration, but rather a learning opportunity. Please do NOT dress in Native American headdresses. Please take the day to maybe educate yourself and the ones you love. Especially young children. Many Native Americans see Thanksgiving as a day of mourning and triggering. Remember, “pilgrims” led a mass genocide to the Native American population.

Hopefully, you will consider and implement the above before celebrating along with me.

challah dough being rolled
challah dough being tied into knots
challah on baking sheet pre-cooked

Celebrating a Mini Thanksgiving:

Thanksgiving Desserts:

Thanksgiving Drinks:

Thanksgiving Favorites and Leftover Recipes:

close up small batch challah rolls
small batch challah rolls with salt

Now, I’ll go into some best tips for making small batch challah rolls.

Challah Knot Rolls

Challah knot rolls are such a simple, tender, and delicious roll to make. I use my normal challah recipe, about halved it (with some adjustments), and instead of making one loaf, I knotted them into rolls.

Challah Roll with Milk

Yes, this recipe does use milk. Traditionally milk isn’t used for challah. However, my grandmother’s recipe had milk, so I use it too.

What do challah rolls taste like?

Challah is similar to a brioche, super soft and tender. It’s very rich and has a little eggy flavor. I use honey so that also adds a bit of sweetness.

Can I make these in advance?

Yes, this is a great option for making the day before Thanksgiving or your event. I would recommend if you’re doing it the day before to keep from salting until day of. These rolls are moist and sometimes the finishing salt can dissolve into the bread. Day of you can slightly dampen bread with water on a paper towel, add salt, and even bake again for a few minutes to reheat.

close up small batch challah rolls
small batch challah rolls
close up small batch challah rolls

Small Batch Challah Roll

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Course: Side Dish
Cuisine: American, Jewish
Prep Time: 30 minutes
Cook Time: 22 minutes
Rise Time: 2 hours
Total Time: 2 hours 52 minutes
Servings: 8 rolls
Author: Amanda Wilens

Equipment

  • Stand Mixer

Ingredients

  • 2 cups + 3 Tbsp, all-purpose flour more for flouring surface
  • 1 ½ Tbsp granulated sugar
  • ½ Tbsp instant dry yeast
  • 1 tsp kosher salt
  • ¼ cup lukewarm water about 105ºF
  • ¼ cup milk room-temperature
  • 2 Tbsp honey
  • ¼ cup olive oil more for greasing bowl
  • 2 eggs divided
  • ½ Tbsp water
  • ½ tsp kosher salt or finishing salt

Instructions

  • In the bowl of a stand mixer with the dough-hook attachment mix water, milk, and sugar. Then add yeast, lightly mix, and let sit for 5 minutes.
  • Next add honey, olive oil, and 1 egg until mixed. Next add flour and salt. Mix on low speed for about 1 minute until mostly mixed. Increase speed to medium until dough forms a ball.
  • Lightly grease a large mixing bowl, and transfer dough to bowl. Lay a damp cloth/flour sack over top of bowl. Allow dough to rise at room temperature for about 1 hour. Just place the bowl on the counter.
  • Lay dough on a floured work surface. Divide dough into 8 equal pieces. Roll each piece into a log, about 1½ inches wide and 10 inches long. Twist each piece into a ball or tie into a knot.
  • Line a baking sheet with parchment paper; transfer rolls to sheet and recover rolls with a damp towel. Let rise for another hour at room temperature*.
  • Preheat oven to 350°F.
  • In a small bowl, combine remaining egg and 1 tablespoon water to make an egg wash. Brush egg wash onto rolls, and sprinkle on kosher salt (or wait to add salt until serving). Place rolls into oven. Bake until golden brown, 20-22 minutes. Remove from oven, and place on a cooling rack before serving.

Notes

• *If your kitchen is colder than 75-ish°F you may want to turn on the oven and place your rising bread above/near it. Or if you have a specific spot that’s a bit warmer near a window or something.
• This is a great option for making the day before Thanksgiving or your event. I would recommend if you’re doing it the day before to keep from salting until day of. These rolls are moist and sometimes the finishing salt can dissolve into the bread. Day of you can slightly dampen bread with water on a paper towel, add salt, and even bake again for a few minutes to reheat.

Nutrition

Calories: 221kcal | Carbohydrates: 31g | Protein: 5g | Fat: 8g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Cholesterol: 42mg | Sodium: 457mg | Potassium: 66mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 7g | Vitamin A: 72IU | Calcium: 19mg | Iron: 2mg
Tried this recipe?Mention @amanda.wilens or tag #amandawilensmakes